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Test Equipment Repair

Service

If you need Test Equipment Repair, Industrial Repair Group is your go to partner for dependable service.

Industrial Repair Group performs extensive component level repairs, touching up solder traces, replacing bad components, as well as full testing of ICs, PALs, EPROMs, GALs, surface mounted components and much more. Every Test Equipment Repair is subjected to dynamic function tests to verify successful repair and then backed by our 18 month repair guarantee. Sealers and conformal coatings are re-applied as needed with each repair restoring your equipment back to its original OEM specs.

Industrial Repair Group is more than a service provider for your industry. We are a partner and a dedicated resource for your team members to rely upon. Feel confident that we don't play the lingo game. We are real people, with real goals. Our company is always open minded and intent on isolating problems to keep organizations up and running 24/7. We are a leading service provider that believes educated personal is the best policy.

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Supported Brands

At Industrial Repair Group, our goal is to offer the best repair in the industry and the most competitive quotes. Our wide selection of services and industry leading 18 month repair guarantee are sure to provide you with the perfect repair solution for all of your industrial needs. We specialize in industrial electronics, electric motor rebuilds, and complete customer satisfaction.

AC TECHNOLOGY INDRAMAT
ACCO BABCOCK INC INDRAMAT & STEGMANN
ACCO BRISTOL INELCO & HS ELECTRONIC
ACCU SORT INEX INC
ACME ELECTRIC & STANDARD POWER INC INLAND MOTOR
ACOPIAN ACRISONS INFRANOR
ACROMAG & MOORE PRODUCTS INGERSOLL RAND
ADEPT TECH INIVEN
ADTECH POWER INC INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY INC
ADVANCE BALLAST INTEL
ADVANCED MICRO CONTROLS INTERMEC
ADVANCED MOTION INTERNATIONAL POWER
AEROTECH & MOTOROLA INTROL DESIGN
AGASTAT IRCON
AGILENT ISHIDA
AGR ISI ROBOTICS
AIRCO ISSC
ALLEN BRADLEY ISSC & SCI
AMBITECH IND JOHNSON CONTROLS & YOKOGAWA
AMETEK KTRON
AMGRAPH KTRON & KB ELECTRONICS
AMICON KB ELECTRONICS
AMPROBE KB ELECTRONICS & RIMA
ANAHEIM AUTOMATION KEARNEY & TRECKER
ANALOGIC KEB COMBIVERT
ANDOVER CONTROLSANILAM & SEQUENTIAL INFO SYS KEB COMBIVERT & TOSHIBA
ANORAD KEITHLEY & HOLADAY
ANRITSU KEPCO
AO SMITH & MAGNETEK KEYENCE CORP
APC KIKUSUI
APPLIED AUTOMATION KME INSTACOLOR
APPLIED MATERIAL KNIEL
APPLIED MICORSYSTEMS KOEHLER COMPANY
APV AUTOMATION KONE
APW MCLEAN KONSBERG
ARBURG KRAUSS MAFFEI
ARCAIR KRISTEL CORPORATION
ARCOM LABOD ELECTRONICS
ARGUS LAMBDA
AROS ELECTRONICS LAMBDA & QUALIDYNE CORP
ARPECO LANTECH
ARTESYN TECHNOLOGIES LEESON ELECTRIC CO
ASCO & ITT LEESONA & ELECTRIC REGULATOR
ASEA BROWN BOVERI & STROMBERG LEINE & LINDE
ASHE CONTROLS LENORD & BAUER
ASI CONTROLS LENZE
ASI KEYSTONE & ANALOGIC LEROY SOMER
ASR SERVOTRON LESTER ELECTRIC
ASSOCIATED RESEARCH LEUZE
ASTROSYSTEMS LH RESEARCH
ATC LINCOLN ELECTRIC
ATHENA LITTON
ATLAS LOVE CONTROLS
ATLA COPCO LOVEHOY & BOSTON
AUTOCON TECHNOLGIES INC LOYOLA
AUTOMATED PACKAGING LUST ELECTRONICS
AUTOMATION DIRECT MAGNETEK
AUTOMATION INTELLIGENCE MAGNETEK & GEMCO ELECTRIC
AUTOMATIX MAN ROLAND
AVERY MAPLE SYSTEMS
AVG AUTOMATION MARKEM
AYDON CONTROLS MARQUIP
B & K MARSCH
B & R MAHTSUSHITA ELECTRIC & FANUC
BABCOCK & ASEA BROWN BOVERI MAZAK
BAKER PERKINS MCC ELECTRONICS
BALANCE ENGINEERING MEMOTEC
BALDOR & ASR SERVOTRON MERRICK SCALE
BALWIN & BEI INDUSTRIAL ENCODER METRA INSTRUMENTS
BALL ELECTRONIC METTLER TOLEDO
BALUFF MHI CORRUGATING MACHINERY
BALOGH MIBUDENKI
BANNER ENGINEERING MICRO MEMORY
BARBER COLMAN MICRO MOTION
BARBER COLMAN MICROSWITCH
BARDAC MICROSWITCH & HONEYWELL
BARKSDALE MIKI PULLEY & BOSTON
BARR MULLIN MILLER ELECTRIC
BASLER ELECTRIC & WESTINGHOUSE MILLER ELECTRIC & LINCOLN ELECTRIC
BAUMULLER MINARIK ELECTRIC CO
BEI INDUSTRIAL ENCODER MINARIK ELECTRIC CO & LEESON ELECTRIC CO
BENDIX DYNAPATH MITUSUBISHI
DENDIX SHEFFIELD MOELLER ELECTRIC
BENSHAW MOOG
BENTLEY NEVADA MONTWILL& SCHAFER
BERGER LAHR MOTOROLA
BEST POWER MOTORLA SEMICONDUCTOR
BIKOR CORP MOTORTRONICS
BK PRECISION MSA
BOBST MTS SYSTEMS CO
BOGEN COMMUNICATION MULLER MARTINI & GRAPHA ELECTRONIC
BOMAC MURR ELEKTRONIK
BORG WARNER & DANFOSS NACHI
BOSCH NATIONAL CONTROLS
BOSCHERT & ARTESYN TECHNOLOGIES NEMATRON CORP
BOSTON NEWPORT
BRANSON NEXT
BRIDGEPORT NIKKI DENSO
BURTON & EMERSON NIOBRARA R&D CORP
BUTLER AUTOMATIC NJE CORPORATION
CAROTRON NORDSON
CE INVALCO NORDSON & DANAHER CONTROLS
CHROMALOX NORTH AMERICAN MFG
CINCINNATI MILACRON & ADVANTAGE ELECTRONICS NORTHERN TELECOM
CLEAVELAND MOTION CONTROL NOVA
CONDOR NSD
CONRAC NUM
CONTRAVES NUMERIK
CONTREX OLEC
CONTROL CONCEPTS OKUMA
CONTROL TECHNOLGY INC OMEGA ENGINEERING
COSEL OMRON
COUTANT & LAMBDA OPTO 22
CROMPTON ORIENTAL MOTOR
CROWN ORMEC
CUSTOM SERVO OSG TAP & DIEP&H HARNISCHFEGER
CYBEREX PACKAGE CONTROLS
DANAHER CONTROLS PANALARM
DANAHER MOTION PARKER
DANFOSS & DART CONTROLS PAYNE ENGINEERING & BURTON
DART CONTROLS PEPPERL & FUCHS
DATA ACQUISITION SYS PJILLIPS & PHILLIPS PMA
DAYKIN PHOENIX CONTACT
DAYTRONIC PILZ
DEC PINNACLE SYSTEMS
DELTA PIONEER MAGNETICS
DELTA ELECTRONICS PLANAR SYSTEMS
DELTRON & POWER MATE POLYCOM
DEUTRONIC POLYSPEDE
DIGITEC POWER CONTROL SYSTEM
DISC INSTURMENTS & DANAHER CONTROLS POWER CONVERSION
DISPLAY TECH POWER ELECTRONICS
DOERR POWER GENERAL & WESTINGHOUSE
DOMINO PRINTING POWER MATE
DREXELBROOK POWER ONE
DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEMS POWER PROP
DUNKERMOTOREN POWER SOURCE
DYNAGE & BROWN & SHARPE POWER SWITCH CORP
DYNAMICS RESEARCH POWER SYSTEMS INC
DYNAPOWER & DANAHER CONTROLS POWER VOLT
DYNAPRO & FLUKE POWERTEC INDUSTIRAL MOTORS INC
DYNISCO PULS
EATON CORPORATION PYRAMID
EATON CORPORATION & DANAHER CONTROLS QEST
ECCI QUINDAR ELECTRONICS
EG&G RADIO ENERGIE
ELCIS RAMSEY TECHNOLOGY
ELCO RED LION CONTROLS & SABINA ELECTRIC
ELECTRIC REGULATOR RELIANCE ELECTRIC
ELECTRO CAM RENCO CORP
ELECTRO CRAFT & RELIANCE ELECTRIC ROBICON
ELECTROHOME ROSEMOUNT & WESTINGHOUSE
ELECTROL RTA PAVIA
ELECTROMOTIVE SABINA ELECTRIC
ELECTROSTATICS INC SAFTRONICS
ELGE SANYO
ELO TOUCH SYSTEMS SCHROFF & STYRKONSULT AB
ELPAC & CINCINNATI MILACRON SCI & ISSC
ELSTON ELECTRONICS SELTI
ELWOOD CORPORATION SEMCO
EMS INC SEQUENTIAL INFO SYS
ENCODER PRODUCTS SEW EURODRIVE & TOSHIBA
ETA SHINDENGEN
EUROTHERM CONTROLS SICK OPTIC ELECTRONIC
EXOR SIEMENS
FANUC SIEMENS MOORE
FANUC & GENERAL ELECTRIC SIERRACIN POWER SYSTEMS
FENWAL SIGMA INSTRUMENTS INC
FIFE CORP SMC & CONAIRSOCAPEL
FIREYE & ITT SOLA ELECTRIC
FIRING CIRCUITS SOLITECH
FISCHER & PORTER SONY
FISHER CONTROLS SORENSEN
FLUKE STANDARD POWER INC
FORNEY STATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS
FOXBORO STEGMANN & INDRAMAT
FOXBORO & BALSBAUGH SUMITOMO MACHINERY INC & TOSHIBA
FUJI ELECTRIC SUMTAK CORP
FUTEC SUNX LTD
GAI & ASEA BROWN BOVERI SUPERIOR ELECTRIC
GALIL MOTION CONTROLS SWEO ENGINEERING & ROCHESTER INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS
GD CALIFORNIA INC T&R ELECTRIC & SYRON ENGINEERING
GEM80 TAMAGAWA & RELIANCE ELECTRIC
GENERAL ELECTRIC TAPESWITCH
GENERAL ELECTRIC & FANUC TB WOODS & FUJI ELECTRIC
GIDDINGS & LEWIS TDK
GLENTEK TECNO ELETTRONICA
GOLDSTAR TECTROL
GORING KERR TEIJIN SEIKI
GOSSEN TEKEL
GRAHAM TODD PRODUCTS CORP
GRAINGER TOEI ELECTRIC
GRAPHA ELECTRONIC TOSHIBA
GREAT LAKES INSTRUMENTS TOTKU ELECTRIC & GENERAL ELECTRIC
GROUPE SCHNEIDER TRACO ENGINEERING
HAAS UNICO
HAMMOND UNIPOWER
HATHAWAY VAREC
HAYSEEN VECTOR VID
HEIDELBERG VERO ELECTRONICS & TELEMOTIVE
HEIDENHAIN CORP VIDEO JET
HIRATA VIEW TRONIX
HITACHI & FANUC VIVID
HITRON ELECTRONICS VOLGEN & POWER SOURCE
HOBART BROTHERS CO WARNER ELECTRIC & EMERSON
HOHER AUTOMATION WESTAMP INC & WESTINGHOUSE
HONEYWELL WESTINGHOUSE
HONEYWELL & NEMATRON CORP WHEDCO
HORNER ELECTRIC WIRE ELECTRIC
HUBBELL & FEMCO XENTEK INC
HUBNER & AMICON XYCOM & WARNER ELECTRIC
HURCO MFG CO YASKAWA ELECTRIC
IEE ZENITH
IMMERSION CORPORATION ZYCRON

Learn About Test Equipment

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Electronic test equipment (sometimes called “testgear” or “bench top”) is used to create signals and capture responses from electronic Devices Under Test (DUTs). In this way, the proper operation of the DUT can be proven or faults in the device can be traced and repaired. Use of electronic test equipment is essential to any serious work on electronics systems.

Practical electronics engineering and assembly requires the use of many different kinds of electronic test equipment ranging from the very simple and inexpensive (such as a test light consisting of just a light bulb and a test lead) to extremely complex and sophisticated such as Automatic Test Equipment. ATE often includes many of these instruments in real and simulated forms.

Generally, more advanced test gear is necessary when developing circuits and systems than is needed when doing production testing or when troubleshooting existing production units in the field.

Test Equipment Switching

The addition of a high-speed switching system to a test system’s configuration allows for faster, more cost-effective testing of multiple devices, and is designed to reduce both test errors and costs. Designing a test system’s switching configuration requires an understanding of the signals to be switched and the tests to be performed, as well as the switching hardware form factors available.

Types of test equipment

Basic equipment

Agilent commercial digital voltmeter checking a prototype

The following items are used for basic measurement of voltages, currents, and components in the circuit under test.

  • Voltmeter (Measures voltage)
  • Ohmmeter (Measures resistance)
  • Ammeter, e.g. Galvanometer or Milliameter (Measures current)
  • Multimeter e.g., VOM (Volt-Ohm-Milliameter) or DMM (Digital Multimeter) (Measures all of the above)

The following are used for stimulus of the circuit under test:

  • Power supplies
  • Signal generator
  • Digital pattern generator
  • Pulse generator

Howard piA digital multimeter

The following analyze the response of the circuit under test:

  • Oscilloscope (Measures all of the above as they change over time)
  • Frequency counter (Measures frequency)

And connecting it all together:

  • Test probes

Advanced or less commonly used equipment

Meters

  • Solenoid voltmeter (Wiggy)
  • Clamp meter (current transducer)
  • Wheatstone bridge (Precisely measures resistance)
  • Capacitance meter (Measures capacitance)
  • LCR meter (Measures inductance, capacitance, resistance and combinations thereof)
  • EMF Meter (Measures Electric and Magnetic Fields)
  • Electrometer (Measures charge)

Probes

A multimeter with a built in clampfacility. Pushing the large button at the bottom opens the lower jaw of the clamp, allowing the clamp to be placed around a conductor (wire).

  • RF probe
  • Signal tracer

Analyzers

  • Logic analyzer (Tests digital circuits)
  • Spectrum analyzer (SA) (Measures spectral energy of signals)
  • Protocol analyzer (Tests functionality, performance and conformance of protocols)
  • Vector signal analyzer (VSA) (Like the SA but it can also perform many more useful digital demodulation functions)
  • Time-domain reflectometer (Tests integrity of long cables)
  • Semiconductor curve tracer

Signal-generating devices

Leader Instruments LSG-15 signal generator.

  • Signal generator
  • Frequency synthesiser
  • Function generator
  • Digital pattern generator
  • Pulse generator
  • Signal injector

Miscellaneous devices

  • Continuity tester
  • Cable tester
  • Hipot tester
  • Network analyzer (used to characterize components or complete computer networks)
  • Test light
  • Transistor tester
  • Tube tester
  • Electrical tester pen
  • Receptacle tester

Test Equipment Platforms

Keithley Instruments Series 4200-CVU

Keithley Instruments Series 4200 CVU

Several modular electronic instrumentation platforms are currently in common use for configuring automated electronic test and measurement systems. These systems are widely employed for incoming inspection, quality assurance, and production testing of electronic devices and subassemblies. Industry-standard communication interfaces link signal sources with measurement instruments in “rack-and-stack” or chassis-/mainframe-based systems, often under the control of a custom software application running on an external PC.

GPIB/IEEE-488

The General Purpose Interface Bus (GPIB) is an IEEE-488 (a standard created by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) standard parallel interface used for attaching sensors and programmable instruments to a computer. GPIB is a digital 8-bit parallel communications interface capable of achieving data transfers of more than 8 Mbytes/s. It allows daisy-chaining up to 14 instruments to a system controller using a 24-pin connector. It is one of the most common I/O interfaces present in instruments and is designed specifically for instrument control applications. The IEEE-488 specifications standardized this bus and defined its electrical, mechanical, and functional specifications, while also defining its basic software communication rules. GPIB works best for applications in industrial settings that require a rugged connection for instrument control.

The original GPIB standard was developed in the late 1960s by Hewlett-Packard to connect and control the programmable instruments the company manufactured. The introduction of digital controllers and programmable test equipment created a need for a standard, high-speed interface for communication between instruments and controllers from various vendors. In 1975, the IEEE published ANSI/IEEE Standard 488-1975, IEEE Standard Digital Interface for Programmable Instrumentation, which contained the electrical, mechanical, and functional specifications of an interfacing system. This standard was subsequently revised in 1978 (IEEE-488.1) and 1990 (IEEE-488.2). The IEEE 488.2 specification includes the Standard Commands for Programmable Instrumentation (SCPI), which define specific commands that each instrument class must obey. SCPI ensures compatibility and configurability among these instruments.

The IEEE-488 bus has long been popular because it is simple to use and takes advantage of a large selection of programmable instruments and stimuli. Large systems, however, have the following limitations:

  • Driver fanout capacity limits the system to 14 devices plus a controller.
  • Cable length limits the controller-device distance to two meters per device or 20 meters total, whichever is less. This imposes transmission problems on systems spread out in a room or on systems that require remote measurements.
  • Primary addresses limit the system to 30 devices with primary addresses. Modern instruments rarely use secondary addresses so this puts a 30-device limit on system size.[1]

LAN eXtensions for Instrumentation (LXI)

The LXI Standard defines the communication protocols for instrumentation and data acquisition systems using Ethernet. These systems are based on small, modular instruments, using low-cost, open-standard LAN (Ethernet). LXI-compliant instruments offer the size and integration advantages of modular instruments without the cost and form factor constraints of card-cage architectures. Through the use of Ethernet communications, the LXI Standard allows for flexible packaging, high-speed I/O, and standardized use of LAN connectivity in a broad range of commercial, industrial, aerospace, and military applications. Every LXI-compliant instrument includes an Interchangeable Virtual Instrument (IVI) driver to simplify communication with non-LXI instruments, so LXI-compliant devices can communicate with devices that are not themselves LXI compliant (i.e., instruments that employ GPIB, VXI, PXI, etc.). This simplifies building and operating hybrid configurations of instruments.

LXI instruments sometimes employ scripting using embedded test script processors for configuring test and measurement applications. Script-based instruments provide architectural flexibility, improved performance, and lower cost for many applications. Scripting enhances the benefits of LXI instruments, and LXI offers features that both enable and enhance scripting. Although the current LXI standards for instrumentation do not require that instruments be programmable or implement scripting, several features in the LXI specification anticipate programmable instruments and provide useful functionality that enhances scripting’s capabilities on LXI-compliant instruments.[2]

VME eXtensions for Instrumentation (VXI)

The VXI bus architecture is an open standard platform for automated test based on the VMEbus. Introduced in 1987, VXI uses all Eurocard form factors and adds trigger lines, a local bus, and other functions suited for measurement applications. VXI systems are based on a mainframe or chassis with up to 13 slots into which various VXI instrument modules can be installed.[3] The chassis also provides all the power supply and cooling requirements for the chassis and the instruments it contains. VXI bus modules are typically 6U in height.

PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation (PXI)

PXI is a peripheral bus specialized for data acquisition and real-time control systems. Introduced in 1997, PXI uses the CompactPCI 3U and 6U form factors and adds trigger lines, a local bus, and other functions suited for measurement applications. PXI hardware and software specifications are developed and maintained by the PXI Systems Alliance.[4] More than 50 manufacturers around the world produce PXI hardware.[5]

Universal Serial Bus (USB)

The USB connects peripheral devices, such as keyboards and mice, to PCs. The USB is a Plug and Play bus that can handle up to 127 devices on one port, and has a theoretical maximum throughput of 480 Mb/s (high-speed USB defined by the USB 2.0 specification). Because USB ports are standard features of PCs, they are a natural evolution of conventional serial port technology. However, it is not widely used in building industrial test and measurement systems for a number of reasons; for example, USB cables are not industrial grade, are noise sensitive, can accidentally become detached, and the maximum distance between the controller and the device is 30 m. Like RS-232, USB is useful for applications in a laboratory setting that do not require a rugged bus connection.

RS-232

RS-232 is a specification for serial communication that is popular in analytical and scientific instruments, as well for controlling peripherals such as printers. Unlike GPIB, with the RS-232 interface, it is possible to connect and control only one device at a time. RS-232 is also a relatively slow interface with typical data rates of less than 20 kbytes/s. RS-232 is best suited for laboratory applications compatible with a slower, less rugged connection.

Test Script Processors and a Channel Expansion Bus

One of the most recently developed test system platforms employs instrumentation equipped with onboard test script processors combined with a high-speed bus. In this approach, one “master” instrument runs a test script (a small program) that controls the operation of the various “slave” instruments in the test system, to which it is linked via a high-speed LAN-based trigger synchronization and inter-unit communication bus. Scripting is writing programs in a scripting language to coordinate a sequence of actions.

This approach is optimized for small message transfers that are characteristic of test and measurement applications. With very little network overhead and a 100Mbit/sec data rate, it is significantly faster than GPIB and 100BaseT Ethernet in real applications.

The advantage of this platform is that all connected instruments behave as one tightly integrated multi-channel system, so users can scale their test system to fit their required channel counts cost-effectively. A system configured on this type of platform can stand alone as a complete measurement and automation solution, with the master unit controlling sourcing, measuring, pass/fail decisions, test sequence flow control, binning, and the component handler or prober. Support for dedicated trigger lines means that synchronous operations between multiple instruments equipped with onboard Test Script Processors that are linked by this high speed bus can be achieved without the need for additional trigger connections.[6]

See also

  • Automatic Test Equipment

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